Posts Tagged ‘Crisis Managment’

iPhone 4 Static: Does “Fuzzy” Reception Kill the Golden Goose?

July 14, 2010

There has been a lot of media noise over the past week or so about the “antenna/reception issue” on the new iPhone 4.

This is exactly the kind of thing the precipitates the boundary between Early Adopter and Early Majority on the Product Adoption Lifecycle.

Early Adopters are willing to put up with a host of issues that may arise in order to get their hands on the new product as soon as possible. If there is a bug or two, which is often the case with a new version, so be it. Being one of the first to have such a device more than makes up for any inconvenience, which in many cases is expected.

Mainstream Early Majority buyers on the other hand, are a different breed. They don’t like experiments or issues. They want a “baked” product that works as expected.

As we have discussed in the past, they buy when their peers or friends buy, and they naturally gravitate to the category leader. They want the “one” and reward leadership by being willing to pay a premium for it. If there is an issue in the early phases… they do what comes naturally. They wait until everything is sorted out!

Consumer Reports Downgrades iPhone 4

Apple’s initial public position is the issue is a software issue, and a fix is on the way. Yesterday (July 13, 2010), as reported in the Wall Street Journal and other publications around the world, Consumer Reports reported that the problem is intrinsic to the design and amounts to a hardware issue that apparently can be fixed with a piece of duct tape in the right place. In response they downgraded their rating of this “hot” product to “not recommended.”

Is this Issue an iPhone Killer?

We doubt it. Remember the first iPhone launch? I had a client who waited in line (actually he had his assistant do it) for hours and hours to get his hands on one. And then for almost a week, he literally pranced around the office showing the device off. He was in heaven. And then, weeks later Apple dropped the price a couple of hundred bucks!

The joy quickly turned to fury and anger. He knew the price would inevitably drop but didn’t expect to blind-sided by such a move for many months. Suddenly his joy didn’t seem like such a good deal. He was right too. Ah the perils of Early Adopter-hood!

To it’s credit, Apple quickly got the message too, and quite smartly offered these early buyers $100 Apple Gift Cards, and the smile quickly returned to my boss’s face.  Just what he wanted, another trip to the Apple Store!

Bottom line. He expected such a move, but later. And Apple acted, after the problem blew up. In the end, sales kept taking off and we know the rest.

It Comes with the Territory

In many ways the situation is similar here. Early Adopters know this kind of thing happens .

We also fully expect Apple will fix the problem. It’s intrinsic to the brand. Other computer makers often force customers to put up with “known issues.” Unlike these more “commodity”-like companies, Apple is premium brand, and we fully expect the problem will be fixed to Consumer Reports’ satisfaction.

Once this happens, Consumer Reports, which in general was quite positive about the device overall, will recommend the product again. The brand connection with customers will be strengthened as consumers worldwide see that the Apple stands by it’s products as expected and the Early Majority will jump in once the dust settles.

Now if they would just open up the iPhone in the US to other carriers!!!!!

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The Case for the Negative Brand?

April 11, 2008

What a week in the airline industry! We all know the airlines are suffering. High fuel costs have decimated profits and now it appears many carriers as well. Just today Frontier went into bankruptcy in attempt to reorganize, and Aloha and a number of others out of business entirely.

Now add to it the FAA and the “inspection crisis” plaguing American Airlines in particular and their MD80 airplane which makes up more than half of their fleet. For the last couple of days, this fleet has been grounded for apparently long overdue wiring inspections in the wheel wells of each plan, causing thousands of flights to be cancelled and over a quarter million customers inconvenienced at best, often stranded in locations they didn’t intend for hours and even days.

Passengers by law can be compensated for hotels should they be stranded overnight, and of course American will rebook passengers on any carrier and will even issue vouchers for cancelled flights as long as you initiate your next flight by April 17.

And if you go to their web site at http://www.aa.com/index_us.jhtml, you can see crisis control marketing in action… notably an “ADVISORY: AIRCRAFT INSPECTIONS AFFECT SOME AA TRAVELon the home page and special jump page at dedicated just for this at http://www.aa.com/aa/pubcontent/en_US/urls/md80.jsp.

If you look carefully you will see that American is terribly sorry, its not our fault, safety is concern #1 and please e-mail us if you are stranded overnight. It appears to be written by a team of lawyers to mitigate liability, nothing else.

Are you kidding!!!

E-Mail us with your travel info and we will get back to you… it doesn’t appear that effected passengers are buying it either. Phone lines are jammed, and customers have been know to try to get through for hours on end with no luck. And ticket lines at airports are no better. Passengers are waiting for 4 and even more hours just to talk to an agent!

What a mess! I will argue, especially in light of the inspections, our trust is shaken, passengers are having vacations ruined, businesses are being disrupted, and all American can do is offer an apology and tell us to e-mail them. The only thing that’s even more surprising to me is the apparent lack of outrage by the public and government officials.

Now let’s go back to Valentine’s Day 2006. A snow storm hits the east coast of the US, shutting down JFK in NY, hub to another airline, in this case a brand that is beloved by its customers. This disrupts Jet Blue to its core. Thousands of passengers are stranded again, some for days. In other cases, they are actually stranded on planes on the tarmac, without electricity, running water and other amenities for hours, in one case up to 14 hours. Not good.

On top of that, their phone systems went down, planes and crews that could have been mobilized to take up some slack, were not utilized and sat idle. There was no apparent recourse and outraged customers went ballistic.

The media also took up the charge. Business Week, which was getting ready to announce their Top 25 Customer Service Champs, had just enough time to publically eliminate Jet Blue, who was ranked #4 overall, from their list entirely. And the talk shows went crazy, with Leno and Letterman all over it.

In this particular case, here was a darling brand in trouble, and Jet Blue rose to the challenge. CEO David Neeleman responded authentically and quickly to the challenge as you can see in this You Tube video produced in response that you can see at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-r_PIg7EAUw.

First you can see Mr. Neeleman is tieless and clearly upset. He is not rehearsed or smooth at all. It looks and feels authentic. He apologized, of course, immediately, and then takes responsibility… and potential liability as well. Then he announced 3 steps they were taking to attack the problem immediately and to top it all off, announced their new, groundbreaking Customer Bill of Rights to ensure better performance in the future.

Talk about getting ahead of a crisis!

Contrast that with American. JetBlue messes up and creates outrage, the far bigger American messes up on an even grander scale, they blame the government, seek to minimize liability and we just yawn and thank the powers above that it wasn’t us on one of those flights.

The difference from our Marketing 2.0 perspective… is brand. American’s brand along with the other once platinum carrier brands is tarnished, almost an anti-brand. When we think of major carriers today, we think delays, inconvenience, lousy service, and with all this FAA stuff going on, minimal trust at BEST.

So a problem like this comes up for American, and from a brand point of view, its business as usual. We expect it. Yikes! No brand conflict here, clearly.

Jet Blue on the other hand was another story. People love flying on it for a number of reasons and have a strong brand connection. That was why when they stumbled back in 2006, the brand was in conflict and we were outraged.

I will argue that in the long term, JetBlue understood that they had to act, and that action, pro-active action would have a cost and a short term negative financial impact on the business. I will argue that these kind of issues can be considered a marketing issue and fixing it marketing spend, which as we now see has strengthened customer loyalty and is likely keeping the business healthier in these times.

American has no brand, nothing to protect. Their quote unquote marketing is all about damage control at best and placing the blame on others. This is not a good indicator of American’s marketing prowess, and long term health of that and other similar airlines.