iPhone 4 Static: Does “Fuzzy” Reception Kill the Golden Goose?

There has been a lot of media noise over the past week or so about the “antenna/reception issue” on the new iPhone 4.

This is exactly the kind of thing the precipitates the boundary between Early Adopter and Early Majority on the Product Adoption Lifecycle.

Early Adopters are willing to put up with a host of issues that may arise in order to get their hands on the new product as soon as possible. If there is a bug or two, which is often the case with a new version, so be it. Being one of the first to have such a device more than makes up for any inconvenience, which in many cases is expected.

Mainstream Early Majority buyers on the other hand, are a different breed. They don’t like experiments or issues. They want a “baked” product that works as expected.

As we have discussed in the past, they buy when their peers or friends buy, and they naturally gravitate to the category leader. They want the “one” and reward leadership by being willing to pay a premium for it. If there is an issue in the early phases… they do what comes naturally. They wait until everything is sorted out!

Consumer Reports Downgrades iPhone 4

Apple’s initial public position is the issue is a software issue, and a fix is on the way. Yesterday (July 13, 2010), as reported in the Wall Street Journal and other publications around the world, Consumer Reports reported that the problem is intrinsic to the design and amounts to a hardware issue that apparently can be fixed with a piece of duct tape in the right place. In response they downgraded their rating of this “hot” product to “not recommended.”

Is this Issue an iPhone Killer?

We doubt it. Remember the first iPhone launch? I had a client who waited in line (actually he had his assistant do it) for hours and hours to get his hands on one. And then for almost a week, he literally pranced around the office showing the device off. He was in heaven. And then, weeks later Apple dropped the price a couple of hundred bucks!

The joy quickly turned to fury and anger. He knew the price would inevitably drop but didn’t expect to blind-sided by such a move for many months. Suddenly his joy didn’t seem like such a good deal. He was right too. Ah the perils of Early Adopter-hood!

To it’s credit, Apple quickly got the message too, and quite smartly offered these early buyers $100 Apple Gift Cards, and the smile quickly returned to my boss’s face.  Just what he wanted, another trip to the Apple Store!

Bottom line. He expected such a move, but later. And Apple acted, after the problem blew up. In the end, sales kept taking off and we know the rest.

It Comes with the Territory

In many ways the situation is similar here. Early Adopters know this kind of thing happens .

We also fully expect Apple will fix the problem. It’s intrinsic to the brand. Other computer makers often force customers to put up with “known issues.” Unlike these more “commodity”-like companies, Apple is premium brand, and we fully expect the problem will be fixed to Consumer Reports’ satisfaction.

Once this happens, Consumer Reports, which in general was quite positive about the device overall, will recommend the product again. The brand connection with customers will be strengthened as consumers worldwide see that the Apple stands by it’s products as expected and the Early Majority will jump in once the dust settles.

Now if they would just open up the iPhone in the US to other carriers!!!!!

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